EFFC

The European Foundation for Falconry and Conservation 

Bringing Falconry values to Europe’s future

 
 
 
vor_dem_Einsetzen_Foto_E.Leix.JPG
 
wild.hatched.peregrines-S.Sielicki.jpg

Our Mission

The EFFC is a non-profit body dedicated to helping reinforce the positive role of Falconry in Conservation, Culture, Education and Animal Welfare.

Learn More

 

“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” .

Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan

 

Capture1.PNG
 

Our Projects

The work that EFFC looks to support broadly falls into two categories. The core pillars of conservation & welfare, and culture & education are of universal importance to Falconry and are fundamental to our remit. 

 

Conservation and welfare 

Projects concerned with the health of wild birds of prey, their quarry species and habitats are of great interest to EFFC. These can be in the form of funding for studies, field work, technology or expertise. Field work to ascertain the scale and causes of a conservation issue can often be costly and time-consuming but we welcome funding applications to assist with this. Falconers also have a deep and intimate understanding of the welfare needs of raptors and it is important that our huge fund of knowledge in this sector is supported and built upon. If your project will further this aim, we may be able to help you.  

 

CULTURE and EDUCATION

Culture is a key element in safeguarding Falconry for future generations and ensuring that an indelible heritage is there to be enjoyed by the next generation. We also place great importance on education, especially of young people, about the conservation of raptor and prey species as well as the UNESCO-inscribed cultural values of Falconry

 

Untitled-3.jpg

Who we are

The EFFC is made up of:

- a Council of Patrons to lend support and advice to the activities of the organisation

- A Board charged with completing the work of the Foundation

- a small panel of experts to advise on specialist matters

 

 
 
 
in Poland ringing peregrines, Foto J. Sielicki.JPG